Goodwill: A Valuable Objective

welcome

Goodwill is people in your neighborhood or market thinking well of you.

Whether they are customers, clients or not. Every person you meet is an asset to your business. And meeting these people is critical.

Our business-building, customer-acquiring strategy begins with goodwill. And it happens one person at a time.

As a micro business owner (underdog), you are your brand. Your smiling face, firm handshake and collaborative demeanor allows you to build a network of acquaintances, fans and allies.

Your network is priceless and might be your 2nd most valuable asset. (You as the key person in your business is #1)

Assuming your business has a marketable value, meeting people is and will be the never ending thing to be done. One new meeting every day will serve you very well. And when the meeting ends, may they be thinking well of you and hoping you will do well.

 

Selling Then and Now

2008

Richard Marcus, is a sales trainer who got my attention recently. He said that “back in the day” sales people spent 80% of their time presenting and closing. And today, successful sales people spend 80% of their time building rapport and building trust.

“Back in the day” is prior to 2008. Anything written about business before that date may very well be obsolete. I would agree. And Richard’s observation I think is perfectly true.

Consider this: customers are the result of our meeting with people and building some rapport and trust so that when they need some help, we might be remembered well, and considered.

 

THE CHALLENGER SALE

Challenger sale

The book, The Challenger Sale, written by Matthew Dixon and Brent Adamson was presented by William Jungermann at BIG today.

Two takeaways — [1] the book was written to garner consulting business for the company for whom the authors work, (a tactic to get the first meeting with a prospect) and [2] based on William’s abridged presentation the central point is, “The “Challenger” type of sales person is one who is well skilled in reading the behavioral style of their prospects and interacting accordingly.” (William suggested the word “chameleon”.)

To elaborate slightly, it is important for the sales person to learn what the prospect wants, and to discover this desire and speak to that desire in the manner that the prospect wants to receive it. It’s not just what is to be sold, but how it is sold. (or more correctly, how it is bought.)

William was excellent in his presentation. And his personal sales training and experience enhanced the presentation to define well the book’s concept. If you are in need of a speaker to talk about selling, you will be pleased with this presentation he shared today. It’s insightful and thought provoking.

It inspired me to think of the following topics for further thought and possible future writing:

[1] Organizational capability; behind the brand

[2] Sales is helping others to make decisions

[3] The “complex” decision

[4] Why do your customers buy?

[5] The decision making scale

Thank you William. And thank you Terry Cox for organizing BIG and for this enlightening session and concept.

 

THE SALES CYCLE: THEN AND NOW

A friend of mine, Richard Marcus, is a sales trainer who got my attention recently. He said that “back in the day” sales people spent 80% of their time presenting and closing. And today, successful sales people spend 80% of their time building rapport and building trust.

“Back in the day” is prior to 2008. Anything written about business before that date may very well be obsolete. I would agree. And Richard’s observation I think is perfectly true.

If you’re like me and Richard, customers are the result of our meeting with people and building some rapport and trust.

DANGER, DANGER, STRANGER, STRANGER

mom-photoWhat did your mother tell you about talking to strangers? Mine too. Did any mom advise any differently? And so, when we meet with a prospect for the first time, what are we? We are perilously close to being strangers. And yet, too often, as our sales managers’ push, we go for the sale? or the no, and we try to believe that each “no” brings us one step closer to a sale. Stop it please. Not at the first meeting. At the first meeting let’s get to know each other a little. Let’s erase the stigma of being strangers. Then at the next meeting, at which we will NOT be strangers, then, we can talk a little business. Our moms will feel better.

 

underdog-set-appt